Man Gets Genetically Modified Pig Heart In A World-first Transplant

Posted by in News On 12th January 2022
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Doctors successfully transplanted the heart of a pig into a patient suffering from chronic heart disease to save his life. 3 days just after an extraordinarily experimental procedure, the Maryland hospital where David Bennett was just being operated on stated on Monday that he is doing fine. Although it would be too early to say if the procedure will succeed, it's an important step forward in the years' goal to one-day employ organs of animals for life-saving surgeries.

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The very first successful transplantation of a genetically altered porcine heart into a human patient was revealed recently by the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) and the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM). Following the historic operation on 7th January 2022, to save his life, the patient of a heart transplant, a 57-year-old male, is doing well.

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
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For the very first time, a genetically altered animal heart was capable of functioning like just a human heart without being rejected by the body. The recipient, David Bennett, will be closely examined over the coming days to see if the transplantation has saved his life.

"It Was either do this transplant or die," says the patient. I wish to live. Bennett remarked just before the operation, "I realize it's a shot in the dark, but it's my final resort." For the previous several weeks, he had been bedridden and hospitalized. "I can't wait to get out of bed once I've recovered."

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The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not permit porcine heart transplants; nonetheless, the Food and Drug Administration approved the procedure throughout this case for "considerate use" because the patient had no other choices.

Khaleej Times
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This medical development might aid healthcare providers in resolving the situation of organ shortage that prevents thousands of people from receiving life-saving heart surgery every year. Approximately 20% of people on the waiting list for heart transplants die while waiting for a transplant or grow too ill to be viable targets candidates for the complicated surgery.

A donor's heart is usually matched to the patient's body size and blood type. Patients who have had a heart transplant should take drugs to keep their immune systems from the rejection of the new organ. Immunosuppressives are medications that prevent the heart transplant from being rejected by reducing the body's natural immunological reaction to unwanted material. These medications, nonetheless, could have adverse effects, such as infections or an elevated chance of certain tumors.

Fit.thequint.com
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