Sexual Dysfunction & Disorders: Medicine That Affect Your Sex Drive

Posted by Sughra Hafeez in Health and Fitness On 18th March 2018
ADVERTISEMENT

Some medications and over-the-counter drugs can affect your libido (desire). Here are medicines that can kill your libido.

ADVERTISEMENT

Lost interest in sex

If you have lost interest in sex the reason might be your medicine that can affect the ability to become aroused or achieve orgasm. NYC reproductive endocrinologist Jaime Knopman, MD, co-founder of Truly, MD says: " If you're losing your libido in your 40s, 50s, or even 60s, your medicine cabinet—not age—may be to blame."

ADVERTISEMENT
Follow ThatViralFeed

Symptoms of low sex drive in women include:

No interest in sexual activity including masturbation

No sexual thoughts or fantasies

difficulty getting pleasure from sex

lack of pleasurable sensations

ADVERTISEMENT

Symptoms of low sex drive in men include:

Erectile dysfunction)

Inability to control the timing of ejaculation (early or premature ejaculation)

A drastic drop in their desire to have sex

Difficulty in achieving and maintaining an erection

Decrease in the semen volume

Loss of body and facial hair

Extreme fatigue

Decrease in energy levels

Decrease in muscle mass

Mood changes

According to the American Urological Association, about 2 out of 10 men older than 60 years have low testosterone. That increases slightly to 3 out of 10 men in their 70s and 80s.

ADVERTISEMENT

Sexual dysfunction

According to the DSM-5, sexual dysfunction requires a person to feel extreme distress and interpersonal strain for a minimum of 6 months (excluding substance or medication-induced sexual dysfunction). Sexual dysfunction affects your relationships or self-esteem, it could be the side effects of some medications also can lead to sexual dysfunction.

Types of sexual dysfunction

Desire disorders —lack of sexual desire or interest in sex

Arousal disorders —inability to become physically aroused or excited

during sexual activity

Orgasm disorders —delay or absence of orgasm (climax)

Pain disorders — pain during intercourse

Drugs that can cause low sex derive

Tricyclic antidepressants

Birth control pills

Proscar

Xanax

Propecia

Antihistamines

Medical marijuana

Anti-seizure drugs

Opioids

Beta blockers

Benzodiazepines

Antihistamines

Anti-hypertensive medications

Causes of sexual dysfunction

Depression

Severe anxiety

Neurological disorders

Hormonal imbalances

Alcoholism and drug abuse

Surgery

Pregnancy and breastfeeding

History of physical or sexual abuse

Previous negative sexual experiences

Lack of connection with your partner

Treatment

Some 43 percent of women and 31 percent of men report some degree of sexual dysfunction. Couple counseling can help increase feelings of intimacy and desire in a relationship. A medication called flibanserin (Addyi) may also help to boost your libido.

ADVERTISEMENT