Steve Jobs's Daughter Lisa Brennan Gives An Insight To Her Rocky Relationship With Her Father In Her Memoir "Small Fry"

Posted by Sama in Science and Technology On 19th August 2018
ADVERTISEMENT

Revealing her rocky relationship with her father, in her upcoming memoir, "Small Fry" Lisa Brennan takes on a journey of an emotional roller coaster ride the words of which are based on complete true events and reading the excerpt only one gets goosebumps over the reality behind Jobs dark life and how one can be this much stone-hearted and ignorant towards your own blood. Brennan gives an insight into her book and discusses the past events of her life that shaped her as the person she has become today and the heartbreaking lessons her father taught her along the way.

#1 Lisa Brennan's Upcoming Book 'Small Fry'

Steve Jobs eldest daughter Lisa Brennan is coming up with her new book 'Small Fry' next month that is considered as a memoir in memory of her late father, the founder of Apple Steve Jobs. Before the official launch of the book, Brennan recently gave an insight into the book, opening up to the world about her rocky relationship with her father.

ADVERTISEMENT

#2 Being Painfully Denied The Right To Be His Daughter

Giving a small glimpse of her upcoming book, Brennan talks about the days spent with her father during his last days of illness and how she was affected mentally when her father confessed only when she turned 27 that he named "Lisa Computer" after her name. In a painful revelation, Brennan also reveals that her father denied Lisa as his daughter and was later sued for child-support payments after which DNA test was done to prove that Lisa was actually his daughter.

The writer also recalls her father telling her "you’re getting nothing" in a disagreement over getting Jobs 'prized Porsche.'

#3 Brennan Grew Up Telling Her Friends About Her 'Rich Dad' Trying To Make Up For Her Father's Absence In Her Life With Her Secret Identity

Brennan opens up about her struggle with dealing her father's indifference towards her and growing up how each experience shaped her and made her who she is today. Brennan never had a warm relationship with her father and as far she remembers it was always a strained relationship between the two. Brennan tells in her book that before she turned 7 she had already moved to 13 places with her mother. Even going through such difficult times and growing up with poverty, Brennan remembers that she used to excitedly brag about her father to her friends and would tell the world that he was a very rich man who lives in a mansion and drives an expensive Porsche. Though she met her father only a few times till now but bragging about her dad and telling the world that Jobs named a computer after her, somehow made Brennan feel significant. She felt more close to him and though the story felt more unreal to her ears it somehow helped her to make up for the absence of her father's role in her life seeing how her friend's fathers were to them, she would remind herself of her secret magical identity and this somehow convinced her that she was not at lost instead her father was a busy man.

ADVERTISEMENT

#4 "My Existence Ruined His Streak"

Apple's Lisa computer was the first personal computer with a graphical interface, pushing computers into the mainstream. Although it was a fail product, the team of Lisa took some of Lisa computer’s best elements like the mouse for their next product Macintosh. Jobs never admitted to his daughter that the computer was named after her and though the truth was quite obvious he lied to her, telling her that Lisa stood for Locally Integrated Software Architecture. Brennan writes, "The idea that he’d named the failed computer after me was woven in with my sense of self, even if he did not confirm it, and I used this story to bolster myself when, near him, I felt like nothing. I didn’t care about computers—they were made of fixed metal parts and chips with glinting lines inside plastic cases—but I liked the idea that I was connected to him in this way. It would mean I’d been chosen and had a place, despite the fact that he was aloof or absent. It meant I was fastened to the earth and its machines. He was famous; he drove a Porsche. If the Lisa was named after me, I was a part of all that. I see now that we were at cross-purposes. For him, I was a blot on a spectacular ascent, as our story did not fit with the narrative of greatness and virtue he might have wanted for himself. My existence ruined his streak. For me, it was the opposite: the closer I was to him, the less I would feel ashamed; he was part of the world, and he would accelerate me into the light."

ADVERTISEMENT
Page 1 Of 4
Next

Your thoughts?

Sponsored Content

ADVERTISEMENT