Study Finds Homophobia and Low Intelligence Are Interlinked

Posted by Editorial Staff in Science and Technology On 21st February 2021
ADVERTISEMENT

A scientific connection has been discovered in an investigation between low degrees of intelligence and the individuals who express homophobic perspectives.

ADVERTISEMENT

The Findings

The findings, issued by researchers at the University of Queensland, Australia, holds existing studies that have drawn correlations earlier between having a low IQ and holding discriminatory views.

This indicates the first time a connection between lower intelligence and homophobia has been observed outside of the US.

PA
ADVERTISEMENT

Sample Examination

The examination drew from a unit of over 11,500 Australians, as declared in the journal Intelligence.

PA
ADVERTISEMENT

HILDA Surveys

The research team examined data from the 2012 Household, Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey, with questions designed to evaluate the cognitive skills of respondents, as well as a 2015 HILDA survey that queried respondents about their views on equitable rights.

Among additional questions, participants were required to place the statement ‘Homosexual couples should have the same rights as heterosexual couples do’ on a range of one (strongly disagree) to seven (strongly agree).

It was eventually found that the lower a person’s intelligence, the more likely they would be to express prejudiced views against same-sex couples.

PA
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

The Authors of the Study Wrote

There are well-known correlations between low cognitive ability and support of prejudicial or non-egalitarian attitudes.

This paper adds to existing knowledge by providing the first analyses of the associations between cognitive ability and attitudes towards LGBT issues. Individuals with low cognitive ability are less likely to support equal rights for same-sex couples.

The founders concluded: ‘Our results suggest that cognitive abilities play a critical, albeit underappreciated, role in prejudice. Consequently, we recommend a heightened focus on cognitive ability in research on prejudice and better integration of cognitive ability into prejudice models.’

PA
ADVERTISEMENT

Strongly Concludes

The connection was discovered to be particularly strong during the evaluation of verbal ability and was observed to hold even after factoring in variables such as education and socioeconomic status.

ADVERTISEMENT