The Nature Of Educational Inequality

Posted by Editorial Staff in Science and Technology On 26th August 2017
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#5 Educational theory

Educational psychology:

Educational psychology is the study of how humans learn in educational settings, the effectiveness of educational interventions, the psychology of teaching, and the social psychology of schools as organizations. Although the terms "educational psychology" and "school psychology" are often used interchangeably, researchers and theorists are likely to be identified as educational psychologists, whereas practitioners in schools or school-related settings are identified as school psychologists.

The intelligence–education relationship:

Intelligence is an important factor in how the individual responds to education. Those who have higher intelligence tend to perform better at school and go on to higher levels of education.

Mind, Brain and Education:

Educational neuroscience is an emerging scientific field that brings together researchers in cognitive neuroscience, developmental cognitive neuroscience, educational psychology, educational technology, education theory and other related disciplines to explore the interactions between biological processes and education.

Philosophy:

As an academic field, philosophy of education is "the philosophical study of education and its problems, its central subject matter is education, and its methods are those of philosophy".The philosophy of education may be either the philosophy of the process of education or the philosophy of the discipline of education. That is, it may be part of the discipline in the sense of being concerned with the aims, forms, methods, or results of the process of educating or being educated

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#6 Discrimination in Education

Various federal laws prohibit discrimination in the realm of education on the basis of race, gender, age, national origin, and other protected categories. Federal laws that ban education discrimination include Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the Equal Educational Opportunities Act of 1974, Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and various other statutes. While these federal laws apply only to schools that accept federal funding, this includes the vast majority of K-12 and higher education institutions.

#7 Examples of what could be discrimination in education

Unfair treatment in education happens a lot. But not every unfair act is illegal. Here are some examples of what could be illegal discrimination in education:

-A college will not accept applications from people who are over 50 years old.

-A teacher treats non English speaking students unfairly because he/she thinks these students cannot learn, and they should not be in school anyway.

-An Asian student is bullied a lot at school because of his race. -The student tells his/her teachers and the school principal what is happening. The school does nothing about the bullying even though it happens every week.

-A college acceptsfewer applications for enrollment from people of color than it does for white people. The college does this because it wants most of its students to be white.

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#8 Areas That Are Protected by the Equality Act 2010

The Equality Act 2010 makes it unlawful to discriminate against persons with a 'protected characteristic'. In total there are nine protected characteristics and they are as follows:

1.Age

2.Disability

3.Gender Reassignment

4.Marriage & Civil Partnership

5.Pregnancy & Maternity

6.Race

7.Religion or Belief

8.Sex (Gender)

9.Sexual Orientation

1.Age

Age, as a protected characteristic, does not apply to pupils in schools.

2.Disability

It is unlawful for an education provider to discriminate directly or indirectly against a pupil on the basis of their disability.

3.Gender Reassignment

It is unlawful for an education provider to treat a pupil less favourably because they have undergone gender reassignment, or they are in the process of undergoing gender reassignment.

4.Marriage & Civil Partnership

Schools must not be discriminatory when providing teaching about Marriage & Civil Partnership. Schools must accurately state the facts about marriage of same sex couples under the law of England and Wales, in a way that is appropriate to the age and level of understanding and awareness of the pupils.

5.Pregnancy & Maternity

It is unlawful for an education provider to treat a pupil less favourably as a result of her becoming pregnant, or because she has recently had a baby, or because she is breastfeeding.

6.Race

It is unlawful for an education provider to treat a pupil less favourably on the basis of their race. The definition of race includes colour, nationality and ethnic or national origins.

7.Religion or Belief

It is unlawful for an education provider to treat a pupil less favourably on the basis of their religion or belief, or their lack of religion or lack of belief.''Religion'' includes, for example, all of the major faith groups whereas ''belief'' includes non-religious world views such as humanism.

8.Sex (Gender)

It is unlawful for an education provider to treat a pupil less favourably on the basis of their gender.

9.Sexual Orientation

It is unlawful for an education provider to treat a pupil less favourably on the basis of their sexual orientation. Schools need to make sure that all gay, lesbian or bisexual pupils, or the children of gay, lesbian or bi-sexual parents, are not singled out for different and less favourable treatment from that given to other pupils.

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