Video Game Glitches Someone Should've Been Fired For

By Michael Avery in Geeks and Gaming On 1st October 2015

#1 DUCK HUNT (NES) - DUCKED UP

It's a simple game about hunting living creatures for sport, but even Duck Hunt was published with a game-breaking glitch. If you can endure your snickering dog for 99 levels of bird-murdering fun, that's it. There's nothing there but a "Level 0," a foul purgatory where immortal birds disappear and reappear at random. The game ends, proving that there's no reward for duck genocide, in real life or in Nintendo. Now for the real challenge: loading those thousands of duck corpses into your pickup.

#2 POKEMON RED/BLUE (GAME BOY) - THE MISSING POKEMON

In the olden days, there were only 151 Pokémon to encounter, and that was good enough. Because of programming limitations, the original Game Boy games left spots for 256 different encounters; 151 were filled with Pokémon, others with trainers, and 39 spots were left empty. By following a specific sequence of events, you'll encounter the mess of code called "Missingno" and be able to capture it. But doing so can cause errors in other parts of your game. Better not catch ‘em all.

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#3 OBLIVION: SHIVERING ISLES (PC) - OBJECT OVERLOAD

The glitch found in Shivering Isles is a simple one: if you play too much, your game will crash. Because of a memory allotment issue, the PC version of the game would freeze once its memory was chock full of extra numbers which were generated for no good reason. Bethesda pushed out a fix as quickly as possible, and the irony that a game called Shivering Isles had freezing issues was lost on no one.

#4 SOULCALIBUR III (PS2) - DON'T CHANGE A THING

The SoulCalibur series is a great collection of fighting games, but a terrible bug appeared in the third installment. The error doesn't manifest as part of the game itself, but rather when players attempt to change any of the save data associated with their games. Set off by any number of conditions, the glitch can potentially destroy all of the data on a memory card. While gamers have been able to figure out workarounds, no amount of jiggle physics are worth losing all of your games.

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#5 TETRIS WORLDS (MULTIPLE SYSTEMS) - INFINITELY EASY

Players may furiously debate whether or not the introduction of "infinite spin" to Tetris Worlds was a glitch or not, but it's game-breaking enough to be considered a travesty either way. By repeatedly hitting the "spin" button, a player can keep a Tetris piece in the air indefinitely, which is a totally cheap move, bro. Tetris HQ unconvincingly denies that the inclusion of this cheater move is a glitch, and it was made optional in subsequent games. But it's surely the worst thing to ever happen to Tetris. Next to appearing in Pixels, that is.

#6 BATMAN: DARK TOMORROW (XBOX, GAMECUBE) - NO SIGNAL

Even the Riddler leaves some clues for Batman about how to defeat him, but in Dark Tomorrow, the only way to really beat villain R'as Al Ghul is by finding a signal device hidden somewhere except the game never tells you where it is, or even that it exists. While it's one of the most Kafkaesque video game twists of all time, no one plays video games to feel like a giant, helpless bug. And making a game with no direction about how to actually win is a pretty big bug, indeed.

#7 SUPERMAN: THE NEW ADVENTURES (NINTENDO 64) - EVERYTHING. EVERY PART.

When a game starts out by covering everything in a "Kryptonite fog" because it can't render anything too far away, you know you're off to a bad start. Regarded as one of the worst games of all time, Superman found an audience among small, stupid children, but is so full of game-crushing glitches that it's considered unplayable. Granted, the whole game takes place in a virtual reality programmed by Lex Luthor, so maybe Lex is just a really, really terrible programmer. From that perspective, this is actually the most clever game of all time.

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