Woman Reveals What Happens When You Stay In The Bath For Too Long

Posted by Abdul Rafay in Bizarre On 3rd June 2021
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A woman's video of what happens when you 'accidentally' sit in a bath for 16 hours has gone viral. The terrifying picture/video combo was shared by TikTok user @msdanalee, and it has been viewed by over half a million people.

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The first image is a static photo of her feet side by side, and they are genuinely horrifying.

The extra pruned feet don't appear to be what they're supposed to be. Dana then uploaded a video in which she claimed her feet appeared grey in real life rather than her true skin tone.

Credit: msdanalee/TikTok
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She captioned the post with: "What an accidental 16hr bath looks like omg. How do I revert my feet fast plz?."

Whether she dozed off for an extended amount of time or the time simply flew by, sixteen hours is a long time to be sitting in gently cooling water. If she had dozed off, she would have awoken as soon as it became cold.

Credit: msdanalee/TikTok
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As they watched the film, that was the biggest question on everyone's lips.

Many people asked in the comments section how someone could sit in a tub for nearly three-quarters of a day and not get sick.

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One person said 'wait, but how was [it] an accident?' while another asked 'how did you not drown?'. Both are pretty valid questions.

A third chimed in with: "What the water gets cold after like 30-40 mins what were you still doing in there?"

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Unfortunately, we haven't received a response because Ms. Dana Lee hasn't responded to any of the questions that have been raised in response to her video. Is this all a set-up for a camera trick or a straight-up lie? We'll never know for sure.

Please allow us to explain why your skin reacts the way it does after being submerged in water for a lengthy period.

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According to the BBC, wrinkled fingers 'are signs of an intact nervous system' and they suggest 'whether the sympathetic nervous system is functional in otherwise unresponsive patients.’

Scientists haven't been able to agree on how humans developed to respond in this way. It's like having good tread on your tires, according to neurobiologist Mark Changizi, and it's become a part of the human condition to offer us more grip when it's wet.

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