Woman Rubs Alcohol On A $50 What Happens Next? I’m At A Loss For Words.

By Sughra Hafeez in Amazing On 23rd December 2017
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The Video was recorded in Vietnam.

When the woman applies rubbing alcohol to the money the coating starts to dissolve away, the number and working on the bill change from $50 to $10.

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That's right: The $50 bill was actually just a ten.

No one really expected her to come up with such a startling discovery, but she did it.

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You might imagine that bank employees would be the best at spotting fake money, but on occasion, even they pass on counterfeit bills.

An estimated $147 million worth of counterfeit money is currently circulating in the US.

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fake counterfeit bills can be easily manipulated to look quite real, especially when an actual lower denomination one is used as a base.

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This story gives us have a mind to rub down our own bills with alcohol.

It’s always smart to keep your eyes on your money, and if you ever do spot counterfeit money report it and don’t try to pass it on!

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See it for yourself below.

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If you have a bill in your possession and are unsure of its authenticity, follow these steps to certify the real value of your money.

Hold a bill up to a light and look for a holograph of the face image on the bill. Both images should match. If the $100 bill has been bleached, the hologram will display an image of Abraham Lincoln, who appears on the $5 bills, instead of Benjamin Franklin.

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All authentic US reserve notes have raised printing.

Many times, counterfeiters have a tough time duplicating this kind of printing method. To detect raised printing, take your fingernail and run it carefully down the collar/jacket. You should feel an unsmooth texture and some vibration on your nail from the ridges. If not, then you better do an in-depth check on the bill.

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Hold the bill up to a light to view the watermark in an unprinted space to the right of the portrait.

The watermark can be seen from both sides of the bill since it is not printed on the bill but is embedded in the paper.

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Look at the borders.

The outside border of real money should be "clear and unbroken," according to Secret Service officials. On Federal Reserve and Treasury seals, the saw-tooth points of the borders should be sharp and well-defined on genuine bills. Seals on a counterfeit bill often have uneven, blunt, or broken saw-tooth points.

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If the bill is held up to an ultraviolet light, the $5 bill glows blue;

The $10 bill glows orange, the $20 bill glows green, the $50 bill glows yellow, and the $100 bill glows red – if they are authentic!

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The last thing to check on a bill is to make sure the serial number matches the supposed series/run year printed on the bill.

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Each letter that starts a serial number for a bill corresponds to a specific year (letter of year correspondence detailed below).

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For more details watch the video below.